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Magnetic Bracelets

Tree of Life Health Magnetic Bracelet

$39.99 $19.95

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Health benefits:

  • improved circulation
  • reduced inflammation
  • promote relaxation
  • improved sleep
  • relieve pain
  • promote positive thinking.

Width: 2.4”

Length: 7.08”

Eco-friendly: nickel-free, lead-free

Estimated delivery time: 7-21 days

14 in stock

SKU: 32892974518 Category: Tags: , ,

Description

Health benefits

Magnetism is thought to bring a lot of health benefits:

  • improved circulation
  • reduced inflammation
  • promote relaxation
  • improved sleep
  • relieve pain
  • promote positive thinking.

Magnets have been used for their health benefits since 200 BC. In China they were part of the healing arts. Later on during Renaissance period they were thought to possess a living energy. This is when magnetic bracelets appeared. They were used to relieve chronic pain. Magnetic therapy enjoyed a resurgence in the 1970s when Albert Roy Davis PhD, who studied the different effects that positive and negative charges have on human biology. He claimed that magnetic energy could kill malignant cells, relieve arthritis pain and even treat infertility.

Magnetic bracelets are thought to have therapeutic value because of their possible influence over blood flow at the wrist arteries. It is thought that the magnetism emitting from the bracelet increases electrical conductivity of the blood and increases the amount of ions (atoms that carry a charge of electricity). The ionization process is believed to improve the efficiency of blood flow.

The healing powers of magnets can speed up metabolism and produce a less acidic atmosphere in the body. The ACS says many proponents of magnets believe cancer cells cannot live in environment where acid is low, so magnetic therapy can therefore stop the spread of tumors. Magnetic fields can adjust nerve impulses, reduce fatty deposits on artery walls, and even modify the thinking process to boost emotional well-being.

Not Only Useful But Beautiful As Well

A true work of art that you can wear proudly. Bring beauty to your life with this carefully crafted bracelet.

Tree of Life

The tree of life is a widespread myth in many of the world’s mythologies. From Asia to Africa, from Europe to America, the tree of life had a special significance for millenniums. In Iran there are several sacred vegetal icons related to life, eternality and cure. In Chinese mythology, a carving of a tree of life depicts a phoenix and a dragon; the dragon often represents immortality. A Taoist story tells of a tree that produces a peach of immortality every three thousand years, and anyone who eats the fruit receives immortality. In Dictionnaire Mytho-Hermetique (Paris, 1737), Antoine-Joseph Pernety, a famous alchemist, identified the tree of life with the Elixir of life and the Philosopher’s Stone.

The tree of life is also widespread across religions. The tree of life first appears in Genesis 2:9 and 3:22-24 as the source of eternal life in the Garden of Eden, from which access is revoked when man is driven from the garden. It then reappears in the last book of the Bible, the Book of Revelation, and most predominantly in the last chapter of that book (Chapter 22) as a part of the new garden of paradise. Access is then no longer forbidden, for those who “wash their robes” (or as the textual variant in the King James Version has it, “they that do his commandments”) “have right to the tree of life” (v.14). A similar statement appears in Rev 2:7, where the tree of life is promised as a reward to those who overcome. Revelation 22 begins with a reference to the “pure river of water of life” which proceeds “out of the throne of God”. The river seems to feed two trees of life, one “on either side of the river” which “bear twelve manner of fruits” “and the leaves of the tree were for healing of the nations”. Or this may indicate that the tree of life is a vine that grows on both sides of the river, as John 15:1 would hint at.

Etz Chaim, Hebrew for “tree of life,” is a common term used in Judaism. The expression, found in the Book of Proverbs, is figuratively applied to the Torah itself. Etz Chaim is also a common name for yeshivas and synagogues as well as for works of Rabbinic literature. It is also used to describe each of the wooden poles to which the parchment of a Sefer Torah is attached.

The “Tree of Immortality” is the tree of life motif as it appears in the Quran. It is also alluded to in hadiths and tafsir. Unlike the biblical account, the Quran mentions only one tree in Eden, also called the tree of immortality, which Allah specifically forbade to Adam and Eve. Satan repeatedly told Adam to eat from the tree, and eventually both Adam and Eve did so, thus disobeying Allah. The hadiths also speak about other trees in heaven.

In Chinese mythology, a carving of a tree of life depicts a phoenix and a dragon; the dragon often represents immortality. A Taoist story tells of a tree that produces a peach of immortality every three thousand years, and anyone who eats the fruit receives immortality.

The Bo tree, also called Bodhi tree, according to Buddhist tradition, is the pipa under which the Buddha sat when he attained Enlightenment (Bodhi) at Bodh Gaya (near Gaya, west-central Bihar state, India). A living pipal at Anuradhapura, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), is said to have grown from a cutting from the Bo tree sent to that city by King Ashoka in the 3rd century BCE. According to Tibetan tradition when Buddha went to the holy Lake Manasorovar along with 500 monks, he took with him the energy of Prayaga Raj. Upon his arrival, he installed the energy of Prayaga Raj near Lake Manasorovar, at a place now known as Prayang. Then he planted the seed of this eternal banyan tree next to Mt. Kailash on a mountain known as the “Palace of Medicine Buddha”

Disclaimer: This product is NOT a medical product and it does NOT replace professional medical treatment.